States Leading the Charge: A Map of the States Proposing Pay to Play Legislation

This map is updated continuously to reflect every state introducing pay for play legislation.

California:

PASSED Fair Pay to Play Act. Colleges in California cannot punish their student athletes for collecting endorsement money – focused on name, image, and likeness.

Washington:

 INTRODUCED HB 1084. Student athletes in Washington would be able to collect pay for endorsements and hire agents.

Colorado:

INTRODUCED law. Student athletes in Colorado would be able to collect pay for endorsements – name, image, and likeness. Also, student athletes could be paid directly for competing.

New York:

INTRODUCED law. Colleges would be required to pay student athletes directly. College athletic departments required to give a 15% share of annual revenue to student athletes. Also, college athletes would have the ability to sell the rights to their own name, image, and likeness.

Maryland:

INTRODUCED law. Student athletes in Maryland would have the right to unionize and participate in collective bargaining over issues related to health, safety, and compensation.

South Carolina:

INTRODUCED law. Would require the biggest colleges in South Carolina to pay $5,000-a-year stipends to athletes in profitable sports like football and basketball. Would give student athletes an opportunity to earn money from sponsorships and autograph sales.

Florida:

INTRODUCED HB 251. Student athletes in Florida would be able to be paid for use of their name, image, and likeness.

Pennsylvania:

INTRODUCED. A Pennsylvania house memo indicates that Rep. Dan Miller (D-42) and Rep. Ed Gainey (D-24) are proposing law that would allow college athletes in Pennsylvania to sign endorsement deals, earn compensation for their name, image, and likeness, and sign licensing contracts in order to earn money. The legislation would also allow college athletes to hire an agent.

Minnesota:

INTRODUCED, TO BE PROPOSED. A member of the Minnesota Legislature is working on a proposal that would let the state’s college athletes hire agents and make money from endorsements. Rep. Nolan West, a Republican from Blaine, said his goal will be to introduce it in the Minnesota House during the 2020 legislative session.

Ohio:

INTRODUCED. NFL 1st round pick turned Ohio Congressman, Anthony Gonzalez,  proposed legislation that will give Ohio student athletes the ability to earn endorsement deals based off their likeness. It will also attempt to put guidelines in place to prevent any new model in which athletes are allowed to make profit from getting out of hand.

Illinois:

INTRODUCED, FILED. Representative Emanuel “Chris” Welch filed a bill that would prohibit schools from removing a student athlete’s eligibility if he or she earns compensation from an endorsement deal, and it would be applied to four-year public and private institutions. 

Kentucky:

INTRODUCED, TO BE PROPOSED. Senator Morgan McGarvey (D.) has drafted a bill that would allow student-athletes to profit from their names, image, and likenesses.

Nevada:

EXPLORING LEGISLATION. Nevada assembly speaker Jason Frierson (D.) and Senator Yvanna Cancela (D.) are in the early stages of exploring legislation similar to California’s Fair Pay to Play Act.

New Mexico:

INTRODUCED, TO BE PROPOSED. Sen. Mark Moores (R.) plans to introduce a legislative proposal that would allow student athletes to make money from endorsement deals and sponsorships.

North Carolina:

PROPOSED. Rep. Mark Walker proposed a bill earlier this year to amend the tax law to allow third parties to pay student athletes.

Connecticut:

PROPOSED. Rep. Chris Murphy says he is working on legislation. Read Madness, Inc., his 14-page report that explores the NCAA and “how everyone is getting rich off college sports – except the players.”

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